A2 - Lesson 13

Part 1 : Video Lesson & Transcript

Part : Listening & Reading comprehension

Part 3 : Use of English

Part 4 : Grammar lesson

Part 5 : Writing an essay & corrections

Part 6 : Speaking, interaction, & explanations.

INSTRUCTIONS

Please make sure you unfold each content for each part of the lesson.  Merci de déplier chaque contenu pour chaque partie de cette leçon.

LINKS TO GRAMMAR BOOKS :

PART 1 : VIDEO BASED LESSON & TRANSCRIPT

See instructions beneath the video.

VIDEO : CLICK ON THE PICTURE

An unsung hero of the civil rights movement

Image

An unsung hero of the civil rights movement

In 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington to nearly a quarter million people. None of it would have been possible without the march's chief organizer – a man named Bayard Rustin. Christina Greer details his life of advocacy as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement, and the challenges he faced as an openly gay black man. [Directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by Christina Greer, music by Bamm Bamm Wolfgang].

VIDEO : EXERCISE

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - INSTRUCTIONS

INSTRUCTIONS TO WORK ON THE VIDEO :

1) Listen to the video without reading the text / transcript

2) Then Listen to the video again reading the transcript as you listen.

3) Then listen to the video again without reading the transcript.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - TEXT

Transcript:

On August 28th, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. That day,  nearly a quarter million people gathered on the national mall to demand an end to the discrimination, segregation, violence, and economic exclusion black people still faced across the United States. None of it would have been possible without the march’s chief organizer – a man named Bayard Rustin. 

Rustin grew up in a Quaker household, and began peacefully protesting racial segregation in high school. He remained committed to pacifism throughout his life, and was jailed in 1944 as a conscientious objector to World War II. During his two-year imprisonment, he protested the segregated facilities from within. 

Wherever Rustin went, he organized and advocated,  and was constantly attuned to the methods, groups, and people who could help further messages of equality. He joined the Communist Party when black American’s civil rights were one of its priorities, but soon became disillusioned by the party’s authoritarian leanings and left. In 1948, he traveled to India to learn the peaceful resistance strategies of the recently assassinated Mahatma Gandhi. He returned to the United States  armed with strategies for peaceful protest, including civil disobedience. 

He began to work with Martin Luther King Jr in 1955, and shared these ideas with him. As King’s prominence increased, Rustin became his main advisor, as well as a key strategist in the broader civil rights movement. He brought his organizing expertise  to the 1956 bus boycotts in Montgomery, Alabama —in fact, he had organized and participated in a transportation protest that helped inspire the boycotts almost a decade before. 

His largest-scale organizing project came in 1963, when he led the planning for the national march on Washington. The possibility of riots that could injure marchers and undermine their message of peaceful protest was a huge concern. Rustin not only worked with the DC police and hospitals to prepare, but organized and trained a volunteer force of 2,000 security marshals. In spite of his deft management, some of the other organizers did not want Rustin to march in front with other leaders from the south, because of his homosexuality. 

Despite these slights, Rustin maintained his focus, and on the day of the march he delivered the marchers' demands in a speech directed at President John F. Kennedy. The march itself proceeded smoothly, without any violence. It has been credited with helping pass the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination, and the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory voting practices. 

In spite of his decades of service, Rustin’s positions on certain political issues were unpopular among his peers. Some thought he wasn’t critical enough of the Vietnam War, or that he was too eager to collaborate with the political establishment including the president and congress. Others were uncomfortable with his former communist affiliation. But ultimately,  both his belief in collaboration with the government and his membership to the communist party had been driven by his desire to maximize tangible gains in liberties for black Americans, and to do so as quickly as possible. 

Rustin was passed over for several influential roles in the 1960s and 70s, but he never stopped his activism. In the 1980s, he publicly came out as gay, and was instrumental in drawing attention to the AIDS crisis until his death in 1987. In 2013, fifty years after the March On Washington, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, praising Rustin’s “march towards true equality, no matter who we are or who we love.” 

PART 2 : COMPREHENSION

  1. Listen to the video and answer all questions below  without reading the transcript /text of the video.
  2. Then read the transcript of the video and check your answers, before looking at the corrections.

LISTENING & READING COMPREHENSION

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - QUESTIONS

According to the video, are these statements true or false?

 

  1. On the day of the speech of Martin L. King Jr. people gathered against him to fight for their rights.
  2. Rustin fought above all for equality and liberty.
  3. Rustin fought for the same ideal as King without ever meeting him.
  4. Rustin had a crucial part in organizing the national march in Washington.
  5. Even though the national march was very well organized it didn’t have any repercussions.
  6. Everyone was pleased with Rustin’s methods and beliefs.
  7. Rustin’s dedication for his cause was constant and never-ending.

 

ANSWERS

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - ANSWERS
  1. F
  2. T
  3. F
  4. T
  5. F
  6. F
  7. T

PART 3 : USE OF ENGLISH

USE OF ENGLISH

UNFOLD - DEPLIER- QUESTIONS

Take a look at the following sentences from the text:

The possibility of riots that could injure marchers. 

The 1965 Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory voting practices. 

The people who could help further messages of equality.

 

That, which and who are relative pronouns. We use relative pronouns to introduce relative clause, which tell us more about people and things. We use who  for people, which for things and that for people or things.

There are two kinds of relative clause: the ones that are used to make clear which person or thing we are talking about. In this kind of relative clause, we can use that instead of who or which; and the ones that give more information about a person, thing or situation. With this kind of relative clause, we use commas (,) to separate it from the rest of the sentence and we use the relative pronouns which and who instead of that.

Exercise:

1. He is the man __________ wants to marry my sister.
2. The boy __________ bought my car is very rich.
3. The only thing __________ matters is your exam.
4. This idea ,__________ changed the world, was great
5. Everything __________  moves is scaring here.

CORRECTIONS

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - ANSWERS
  1. Who
  2. Who
  3. That
  4. Which
  5. That

TRADUCTION

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - EXERCISE

Traduire les phrases suivantes en anglais, issues du texte, puis retrouver ces phrases dans les paragraphes deux et trois du texte en anglais:

1. Il est resté pacifiste toute sa vie, et fut emprisonné en 1944 en temp qu'objecteur de conscience durant la 2eme guerre mondiele.

 

2. Il rejoignit le parti communiste quand les droit des Noirs Americains etaient une de ses prioritées, mais il fut bien désabusé par le coté autoritaire du pari et parti.

 

PART 4 : GRAMMAR

LESSON

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - EXPLANATION

Essential Grammar in use p 171-172

Unit 82  a lot   much   many

EXERCISES

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - QUESTIONS

Put in much or many

1 Did you buy ..... food ?

2 There aren't .....  hotels in this town.

3 We haven't got ...... petrol.

4 Were there .......... people on the train?

5 Did ........ students fails the examination ?

6 Paula hasn't got ....... money.

7 I wasn't very hungry . I didn't eat ........ .

8 I haven't seen Georges for ..... years.

Put in how much or how many.

9 ...... people are coming to the party?

10 ...... milk do you want in your coffee?

11 ....... bread did you buy ?

12 ......... players are there in a football team?

CORRECTIONS

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - CORRECTIONS
  1. much
  2. many
  3. much
  4. many
  5. many
  6. much
  7. much
  8. many
  9. How many
  10. How much
  11. How much
  12. How many

PART 5 : WRITING

VOCABULARY

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(please note that this definitions are according to the context)

 

Segregation (noun) - the enforced separation of different racial groups in a country, community, or establishment.

 

Advocated (past and past participle of the verb to advocate) - publicly recommend or support.

 

Attuned (past and past participle of the verb to attune) - make receptive or aware.

 

Leanings (noun, plural of leaning) - a tendency or partiality of a particular kind.

 

Undermine (verb) - lessen the effectiveness, power, or ability of, especially gradually or insidiously.

 

Deft (adjective) - demonstrating skill and cleverness.

 

Slights (noun, plural of slight) - an insult caused by a failure to show someone proper respect or attention.

 

Peers (noun, plural of peer) - a person of the same age, status, or ability as another specified person.

 

Eager (adjective) - strongly wanting to.

 

Passed over (past simple and past participle of the phrasal verb to pass over) - to ignore or not give attention.

WRITING

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - ESSAY

Peseshet is a doctor and a teacher. The video describes a typical day of her life.

Now it is you turn. Write a text :

- Present yourself.

- Describe your profession.

- Tell what you did to get this job.

- Describe a typical day of your life : what usually happens when you are at work?

 

CORRECTION

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - OPTION

You can book a one to one class with a teacher who will correct your writing exercise.  One to one classes can be online, with a video call, anytime of the day. 

This gives you full flexibility for your timetable.

Please send us an email at afterschool at afterschoollyon.com.

PART 6 : SPEAKING

SPEAKING

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - OPTION

You can book a one to one class with a teacher for the speaking.  One to one classes can be online, with a video call, anytime of the day. 

This gives you full flexibility for your timetable.

Please send us an email at afterschool at afterschoollyon.com.

Our online classes range from A1 to C2 levels, including specific class contents and online video classes.  They are designed to improve communication of spoken and written English with learner-centred lessons which help build students’ confidence, accuracy and fluency.

Our online learning classes offer an extensive level of flexibility for individual students, with comprehensive syllabus and content.