A2 - Lesson 11

Part 1 : Video Lesson & Transcript

Part : Listening & Reading comprehension

Part 3 : Use of English

Part 4 : Grammar lesson

Part 5 : Writing an essay & corrections

Part 6 : Speaking, interaction, & explanations.

INSTRUCTIONS

Please make sure you unfold each content for each part of the lesson.  Merci de déplier chaque contenu pour chaque partie de cette leçon.

LINKS TO GRAMMAR BOOKS :

PART 1 : VIDEO BASED LESSON & TRANSCRIPT

See instructions beneath the video.

VIDEO : CLICK ON THE PICTURE

Harvey Milk's radical vision of equailty.

Image

Harvey Milk's radical vision of equailty.

By 1973, Harvey Milk had already been many things: naval officer, high school teacher, bit-part actor and wandering hippie. Starting fresh in San Francisco, his belief in a more personal approach to local government led him to run for office in the heart of American gay culture, the Castro. Lillian Faderman details the tenacity and courage of California's first openly gay public official. [Directed by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by WORKPLAYWORK and Cem Misirlioglu].

VIDEO : EXERCISE

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - INSTRUCTIONS

INSTRUCTIONS TO WORK ON THE VIDEO :

1) Listen to the video without reading the text / transcript

2) Then Listen to the video again reading the transcript as you listen.

3) Then listen to the video again without reading the transcript.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - TEXT

By 1973, Harvey Milk had already been many things: naval officer, high school teacher, bit-part actor, and wandering hippie. But as he embarked on yet another life running a camera shop in San Francisco, he already found himself distracted. From the Watergate hearings on national news, to the teacher who had to rent a projector when her school couldn’t afford one, Harvey saw a desperate need for political reform. 

Milk strongly believed that tight knit neighbourhoods were essential to the fabric of the city, and that government should solve those community’s most practical problems. From fixing potholes and putting up stop signs, to promoting a friendly culture of cooperation, Milk envisioned a more personal approach to local government. 

This philosophy led him to run for the city’s Board of Supervisors as the representative for his own district, which included the heart of American gay culture, the Castro. At this time, police brutality, discrimination and media stereotyping plagued the LGBT community, labeling Harvey and his supporters as political outsiders. But Milk refused to downplay his sexuality. He was sure that gay rights could never be won from the closet, and he saw the Castro as one of many minorities without representation in city politics. Milk was determined to bring these basic government services to all of San Francisco’s disenfranchised groups, regardless of race, age, or sexuality. 

But despite his flair for public speaking and open-hearted approach, voters couldn’t see Milk’s radical vision. In 1973, he lost his first bid for the Board of Supervisors. In 1975, he lost again. A year later, he ran for the California Assembly– and lost. Yet he tirelessly continued to support his district, befriending bartenders, construction unions, and local Chinese grocers. This earned him the affectionate title, the "mayor of Castro Street.” And when he ran his third campaign for the Board of Supervisors in 1977, Harvey finally won the seat– becoming one of the first openly gay public officials in US history. 

Elated, Milk arrived in office determined to make lasting change. He immediately introduced a bill outlawing discrimination on the grounds of sexuality and launched a major clean-up of the city. But not everyone was happy with this direction. Anti-gay sentiment was gaining national momentum, especially in the form of California’s Proposition 6. 

The proposition, which sought to make it illegal for homosexuals to work in Californian schools, would prove to be the biggest battle of Milk’s career. Supporters of Prop 6 attacked the LGBT community, calling them unfit to work with students. But Milk urged them not to hide in fear: “Come out to your relatives. Come out to your friends, if indeed they are your friends. Come out to your neighbours, to your fellow workers… break down the myths. Destroy the lies and distortions. For your sake. For their sake.” Alongside other activists, he ran an incandescent campaign against hate. 

On November 7, 1978, Prop 6 was defeated in a landslide. It was proof that Milk’s message was gaining traction. But just twenty days after this inspiring victory, he was assassinated at City Hall– killed alongside San Francisco Mayor George Moscone. 

Both men had been murdered by Dan White, a former fellow supervisor, who had positioned himself against those he called "radicals, social deviates and incorrigibles.” He had frequently clashed with Harvey at Board meetings, and resented the spirit of change which Milk personified for many. The night of Milk's murder, thousands marched by candlelight through the city. 

In the wake of this tragedy, yet another injustice arose. In a highly controversial verdict, White received a sentence of only seven years and eight months– a decision that sparked uproar throughout the city in what became known as the White Night Riots.

But even after his death, Milk continued to preach his hopeful cause. He left his friends and followers a total of three different tapes to be played in the event of his assassination. They leave us with a call to action, and a reminder that everyone is welcome in the fight against injustice: "I ask for the movement to continue… and if a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door…”

PART 2 : COMPREHENSION

  1. Listen to the video and answer all questions below  without reading the transcript /text of the video.
  2. Then read the transcript of the video and check your answers, before looking at the corrections.

LISTENING & READING COMPREHENSION

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - QUESTIONS

According to the video, are these statements true or false?

 

  1. Milk wished the political intervention to be more personal.
  2. Milk intended to represent majority groups in the city’s Board of Supervisors.
  3. Harvey Milk lost three times the seat for the Board of Supervisors.
  4. Harvey was the very first openly gay public official in America.
  5. Milk’s main goal was to stop discrimination against homosexuals.
  6. The assassination of Milk was done by someone who believed his ideas to be radical.
  7. Even after his death, Milk inspired people to keep fighting for their rights and equality.

ANSWERS

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - ANSWERS
  1. T
  2. F
  3. F
  4. F
  5. T
  6. T
  7. T

PART 3 : USE OF ENGLISH

USE OF ENGLISH

UNFOLD - DEPLIER- QUESTIONS

Please look at the following sentence from the text:

 

Both men had been murdered by Dan White.

 

What is the tense used in this sentence?

Answer: Past perfect continuous.

 

We use the Past Perfect Continuous to show that something started in the past and continued up until another time in the past. "For ten minutes" and "for three weeks" are both durations which can be used with the Past Perfect Continuous. Using the Past Perfect Continuous before another action in the past is a good way to show cause and effect.

 

 

Exercise:

In the sentences below you will find some situations where the use of the past perfect continuous is appropriated. Try to complete them.

  1. I _______________________________ (work) all day, so I didn’t want to go out.
  2. She _______________________________ (sleep) for ten hours when I woke her. 3. They _______________________________ (live) in Beijing for three years when he lost his job.

4. When we met, you _______________________________ (work) at that company for six months.

5. We _______________________________ (eat) all day, so we felt a bit ill.

CORRECTIONS

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - ANSWERS
  1. had been working
  2. had been sleeping
  3. had been living
  4. had been working
  5. had been eating

TRADUCTION

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - EXERCISE

Traduire les phrases suivantes en anglais, issues du texte, puis retrouver ces phrases dans les deux premiers paragraphes du texte en anglais:

1.Des auditions du Watergate, à ce professeur qui a loué un retroprojecteur car son école ne pouvais pas se le permettre, Harvey vit qu'une reforme politique deseperée etait nécéssaire.

.

2. Mike croyais fermement qu'un quartier qui se serre les coudes était le fondement essentiel de la vile et que le gouvernement devait resoudre les probleme pratique de ces communautées.

PART 4 : GRAMMAR

LESSON

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - EXPLANATION

Essential Grammar in use p 167-168

Unit 80  All most some any no/none

EXERCISES

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - QUESTIONS

Complete the sentences. Use the words in brackets (some/most etc. ). Sometimes you need of ( some of / most of ) etc.

  1. ....... children like playing. (most)
  2. ........  money is yours. (some)
  3. ......... people never stop talking. (some)
  4. .........  the shops in the city centre close at 6.30. (most)
  5. You can change your money in ..............  banks. (most)
  6. I don't like  ...............  pictures in the living room. (any)
  7. He's lost ..............  money. (all)
  8. .............  my friends are married. (none)
  9. Do you know  .........  the people in this photograph ? (any)
  10. ...........  birds can fly. (most)
  11. I enjoyed  .............. the film but I didn't like the ending. (most)
  12. ............  sports are very dangerous. (some)
  13. We can't find anywhere to stay. ............  the hotels are full. (all)
  14. You must have ......... this cheese . It's delicious. (some)
  15. The weather was bad when we were on holiday. It rained ........... the time (most)

CORRECTIONS

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - CORRECTIONS
  1. most
  2. some of
  3. some
  4. most of
  5. most
  6. any of
  7. all or all of
  8. none of
  9. any of
  10. most
  11. most of
  12. some
  13. all or all of
  14. some of
  15. most of

PART 5 : WRITING

VOCABULARY

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - WORD LIST

(please note that this definitions are according to the context)

 

Knit (adjective) - united.

 

Potholes (noun, plural of pothole) - a depression or hollow in a road surface caused by wear or subsidence.

 

Envisioned (past and past participle of the verb to envision) - imagine as a future possibility; visualize.

 

Downplay (verb) - make (something) appear less important than it really is.

 

Disenfranchised (adjective) - deprived from rights or privileges.

 

Flair (noun) - a special or instinctive aptitude or ability for doing something well.

 

Bid (noun) - an attempt or effort to achieve something.

 

Elated (adjective) - in high spirits; exultant or proud.

 

Uproar (noun) - a public expression of protest or outrage.

 

Preach (verb) - to try to persuade other people to believe in a particular belief.

 

WRITING

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - ESSAY

Peseshet is a doctor and a teacher. The video describes a typical day of her life.

Now it is you turn. Write a text :

- Present yourself.

- Describe your profession.

- Tell what you did to get this job.

- Describe a typical day of your life : what usually happens when you are at work?

 

CORRECTION

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - OPTION

You can book a one to one class with a teacher who will correct your writing exercise.  One to one classes can be online, with a video call, anytime of the day. 

This gives you full flexibility for your timetable.

Please send us an email at afterschool at afterschoollyon.com.

PART 6 : SPEAKING

SPEAKING

UNFOLD - DEPLIER - OPTION

You can book a one to one class with a teacher for the speaking.  One to one classes can be online, with a video call, anytime of the day. 

This gives you full flexibility for your timetable.

Please send us an email at afterschool at afterschoollyon.com.

Our online classes range from A1 to C2 levels, including specific class contents and online video classes.  They are designed to improve communication of spoken and written English with learner-centred lessons which help build students’ confidence, accuracy and fluency.

Our online learning classes offer an extensive level of flexibility for individual students, with comprehensive syllabus and content.